More Legislation for Landlords and Tenants

Following Tenant Fees Act (1st June 2019) electrical safety checks (probably October 2019), Homes Fit for Human Habitation (20 March 2019)  the government have announced the banning of Section 21 notices. These are the notices that enable landlords to reclaim their property at the end of a fixed term tenancy.

Housing Secretary James Brokenshire said that evidence showed so-called Section 21 evictions were one of the biggest causes of family homelessness.Mr Brokenshire also said the plans would offer "speedy redress" to landlords seeking to regain possession of their property for legitimate reasons, such as to sell it or to move into it themselves.

At the moment, landlords can give tenants eight weeks' notice after a fixed-term contract ends. Under the government's new plans, landlords would have to provide a "concrete, evidenced reason already specified in law" in order to bring tenancies to an end.

The National Landlords Association (NLA) said its members should be able to use a Section 8 possession notice to evict someone who has broken the terms of their tenancy - for example by not paying rent. This sometimes involves landlords spending money taking action in court if the tenants refuse to leave.

But NLA chief executive Richard Lambert said many landlords were forced to use Section 21 as they have "no confidence" in the courts to deal with Section 8 applications "quickly and surely".

He said the proposed changes would create a new system of indefinite tenancies by the "back door", and the focus should be on improving the Section 8 and court process instead.

Penny Pate Director of Castles lettings said "These proposals will mean even more confusion in the Private Rented Sector". She continued "These rafts of legislation are coming thick and fast so more than ever agents and landlords need to make sure they are staying the right side of all the different legislation".